Analysis of DEFRA Green Segmentation by Values

The British government department DEFRA (Department of Food, Environment and Rural Affairs, operating in England and Wales) developed a ‘green segmentation’ based on self-reported public behaviours, in 2008. This segmentation was intended to be used to understand and drive ‘green’ or ‘pro-environmental’ behaviours and was widely reported in the media and used by various organisations .

In 2010 DEFRA commissioned CDSM (www.cultdyn.co.uk) to apply Values Modes segmentation to the DEFRA segments, which are based mainly on behaviour and standard demographics and social questions.  This values analysis has not been published and is explained here.  For users of the DEFRA ‘green segmentation’ it should give a guide to more effective strategy for engagement and behaviour change because it is motivational.  The analysis also reveals that some of the segments are not ‘real’ segments at all, in so far as they represent people with a variety of fundamentally different, even opposing unconscious motivations, and that any attempt to  treat these people as a homogenous group based on common behaviours or standard demographics, would not be likely to workThe British government department DEFRA (Department of Food, Environment and Rural Affairs, operating in England and Wales) developed a ‘green segmentation’ based on self-reported public behaviours, in 2008. This segmentation was intended to be used to understand and drive ‘green’ or ‘pro-environmental’ behaviours  and was widely reported in the media and used by various organisations.

In 2010 DEFRA commissioned CDSM (www.cultdyn.co.uk) to apply Values Modes segmentation to the DEFRA segments, which are based mainly on behaviour and standard demographics and social questions. This values analysis has not been published and is explained here (below). For users of the DEFRA ‘green segmentation’ it should give a guide to more effective strategy for engagement and behaviour change because it is motivational. The analysis also reveals that some of the segments are not ‘real’ segments at all, in so far as they represent people with a variety of fundamentally different, even opposing unconscious motivations, and that any attempt to treat these people as a homogenous group based on common behaviours or standard demographics, would not be likely to work.

Analysis here.Note on Values and DEFRA C Rose

 

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